NoSQl Consulting

Sep

14

September 14 , 2015 | Posted by Robert Urban |

NoSQl Consulting

NoSQL Consulting | NoSQl Staffing

Paperboat Media is the Big Data staffing company of choice for many companies. Our expertise in finding hard to find talent is second to none. If you are in need of a NoSQL expert, contract, project or perm, please contact us today to discuss your need.

The below is an article given by permission by MongoDB explaining in technical terms what one of the hottest jobs in the Big Data space is and what it means.

What is NoSQL?

NoSQL encompasses a wide variety of different database technologies that were developed in response to a rise in the volume of data stored about users, objects and products, the frequency in which this data is accessed, and performance and processing needs. Relational databases, on the other hand, were not designed to cope with the scale and agility challenges that face modern applications, nor were they built to take advantage of the cheap storage and processing power available today.

NoSQL Database Types

  • Document databases pair each key with a complex data structure known as a document. Documents can contain many different key-value pairs, or key-array pairs, or even nested documents.
  • Graph stores are used to store information about networks, such as social connections. Graph stores include Neo4J and HyperGraphDB.
  • Key-value stores are the simplest NoSQL databases. Every single item in the database is stored as an attribute name (or “key”), together with its value. Examples of key-value stores are Riak and Voldemort. Some key-value stores, such as Redis, allow each value to have a type, such as “integer”, which adds functionality.
  • Wide-column stores such as Cassandra and HBase are optimized for queries over large datasets, and store columns of data together, instead of rows.

The Benefits of NoSQL

When compared to relational databases, NoSQL databases are more scalable and provide superior performance,and their data model addresses several issues that the relational model is not designed to address:

  • Large volumes of structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data
  • Agile sprints, quick iteration, and frequent code pushes
  • Object-oriented programming that is easy to use and flexible
  • Efficient, scale-out architecture instead of expensive, monolithic architecture

Dynamic Schemas

Relational databases require that schemas be defined before you can add data. For example, you might want to store data about your customers such as phone numbers, first and last name, address, city and state – a SQL database needs to know what you are storing in advance.

This fits poorly with agile development approaches, because each time you complete new features, the schema of your database often needs to change. So if you decide, a few iterations into development, that you’d like to store customers’ favorite items in addition to their addresses and phone numbers, you’ll need to add that column to the database, and then migrate the entire database to the new schema.

If the database is large, this is a very slow process that involves significant downtime. If you are frequently changing the data your application stores – because you are iterating rapidly – this downtime may also be frequent. There’s also no way, using a relational database, to effectively address data that’s completely unstructured or unknown in advance.

NoSQL databases are built to allow the insertion of data without a predefined schema. That makes it easy to make significant application changes in real-time, without worrying about service interruptions – which means development is faster, code integration is more reliable, and less database administrator time is needed.

Auto-sharding

Because of the way they are structured, relational databases usually scale vertically – a single server has to host the entire database to ensure reliability and continuous availability of data. This gets expensive quickly, places limits on scale, and creates a relatively small number of failure points for database infrastructure. The solution is to scale horizontally, by adding servers instead of concentrating more capacity in a single server.

“Sharding” a database across many server instances can be achieved with SQL databases, but usually is accomplished through SANs and other complex arrangements for making hardware act as a single server. Because the database does not provide this ability natively, development teams take on the work of deploying multiple relational databases across a number of machines. Data is stored in each database instance autonomously. Application code is developed to distribute the data, distribute queries, and aggregate the results of data across all of the database instances. Additional code must be developed to handle resource failures, to perform joins across the different databases, for data rebalancing, replication, and other requirements. Furthermore, many benefits of the relational database, such as transactional integrity, are compromised or eliminated when employing manual sharding.

NoSQL databases, on the other hand, usually support auto-sharding, meaning that they natively and automatically spread data across an arbitrary number of servers, without requiring the application to even be aware of the composition of the server pool. Data and query load are automatically balanced across servers, and when a server goes down, it can be quickly and transparently replaced with no application disruption.

Cloud computing makes this significantly easier, with providers such as Amazon Web Services providing virtually unlimited capacity on demand, and taking care of all the necessary database administration tasks. Developers no longer need to construct complex, expensive platforms to support their applications, and can concentrate on writing application code. Commodity servers can provide the same processing and storage capabilities as a single high-end server for a fraction of the price.

Replication

Most NoSQL databases also support automatic replication, meaning that you get high availability and disaster recovery without involving separate applications to manage these tasks. The storage environment is essentially virtualized from the developer’s perspective.

Integrated Caching

A number of products provide a caching tier for SQL database systems. These systems can improve read performance substantially, but they do not improve write performance, and they add complexity to system deployments. If your application is dominated by reads then a distributed cache should probably be considered, but if your application is dominated by writes or if you have a relatively even mix of reads and writes, then a distributed cache may not improve the overall experience of your end users.

Many NoSQL database technologies have excellent integrated caching capabilities, keeping frequently-used data in system memory as much as possible and removing the need for a separate caching layer that must be maintained.

Implementing a NoSQL Database in Your Organization

Often, organizations will begin with a small-scale trial of a NoSQL database in their organization, which makes it possible to develop an understanding of the technology in a low-stakes way. Most NoSQL databases are also open-source, meaning that they can be downloaded, implemented and scaled at little cost. Because development cycles are faster, organizations can also innovate more quickly and deliver superior customer experience at a lower cost.

Selecting the right database for your application and goals is important. PaperBoat Media’s staffing division can help you find the expert level talent that will provide the guidance you need in the early stages of evaluation.

As you consider alternatives to legacy infrastructures, you may have several motivations: to scale or perform beyond the capabilities of your existing system, identify viable alternatives to expensive proprietary software, or increase the speed and agility of development. When selecting the right database for your business and application, there are five important dimensions to consider.

Data Model  Document Model  Graph Model  Key-Value and Wide Column Models

Query Model  Document Database  Graph Database  Key Value and Wide Column Databases

 Consistency Model Consistent Systems  Eventually Consistent Systems

 APIs  Idiomatic Drivers  Thrift or RESTful APIs  SQL-Like APIs

 Commercial Support and Community Strength  Commercial Support  Community Strength 6 Nexus Architecture

This article in its entirety was used by permission from MongoBD.com – For more detailed information on the 5 dimensions, please read their white paper